Jun 082010
 

The Graviola tree (called guanabana in Mexico) is a healing tree that grows deep within the Amazon rain forest in South America.

Various parts of the Graviola tree, including the bark, leaves, roots, fruit and fruit-seeds, have been used for centuries by medicine men and native Indians in South America to treat heart disease, asthma, liver problems and arthritis

Extracts from this powerful tree could literally change how you, your doctor, and possibly the rest of the world think about curing cancer.

Unlike chemotherapy, the compound extracted from the Graviola tree selectively hunts down and kills only cancer cells. It does not harm healthy cells.

The compound effectively targets and kills malignant cells in 12 types of cancer, including colon, breast, prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer.

The tree compounds proved to be up to 10,000 times stronger in slowing the growth of cancer than Adriamycin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug

With extracts from this powerful tree, it may now be possible to…

* Conquer cancer safely and effectively with an all-natural therapy that doesn’t cause extreme nausea, weight loss, and hair loss

* Protect your immune system and evade deadly infections

* Feel strong and healthy throughout the course of treatment

* Boost your energy and improve your outlook on life

The amazing anti-cancer properties of the Graviola tree have been extensively researched, so why haven’t you heard anything about it? If Graviola extract is half as promising as it appears to be, why doesn’t every single oncologist at every major hospital insist on using it on all his or her patients?

Graviola is a natural product, therefore no Patents can be applied to this product.

Once again we have the situation where nobody will provide the capital for testing & approval procedures of a product that would greatly benefit the treatment of seriously ill patients.

Governments worldwide (possible UN?) need to identify mechanisms for approvals to take place, such a mechanism would benefit all serious ill patients.

Graviola products (capsules and tinctures) are becoming more widely available in the U.S. market, and now offered under several different manufacturer’s labels in health food stores.


Graviola the plant that worked too well

I found out about Graviola from an email I received from my Health Sciences Institute e-alert. The following are extracts from that email.

One of America’s biggest billion-dollar drug makers began a search for a cancer cure and their research centered on Graviola, a legendary healing tree from the Amazon Rainforest.

Going on very little documented scientific evidence, the company poured money and resources into testing the tree’s anti-cancerous properties, and were shocked by the results. Graviola proved itself to be a cancer-killing dynamo.

But that’s where the Graviola story nearly ended.

The company had one huge problem with the Graviola tree, it’s completely natural, and so, under federal law, not patentable. There’s no way to make serious profits from it.

It turns out the drug company invested nearly seven years trying to synthesize two of the Graviola tree’s most powerful anti-cancer ingredients.

They tried to isolate and produce man-made clones of what makes the Graviola so potent, then they would be able to patent it and make their money back. Alas, they hit a brick wall.

The original simply could not be replicated.

There was no way the company could protect its profits, or even make back the millions it poured into research.

As the dream of huge profits evaporated, their testing on Graviola came to a screeching halt.

Even worse, the company shelved the entire project and chose not to publish the findings of its research!

Luckily, however, there was one scientist from the Graviola research team whose conscience wouldn’t let him see such atrocity committed. Risking his career, he contacted a company that’s dedicated to harvesting medical plants from the Amazon Rainforest and blew the whistle.

Following his conscience and risking his career, he contacted Raintree Nutrition, a company dedicated to harvesting plants from the Amazon.

As a result, Raintree went into high gear and began to research related studies published on Graviola.

They discovered that several other teams in the United States (in addition to that of the drug company) had been testing Graviola in vitro (in test tubes).

The results supported the drug company’s secret findings; Graviola had been shown to kill cancer cells.
Encouraged by these early laboratory tests, Raintree hired indigenous Indian tribes in Brazil to grow and harvest the tree.

They spent a year on research and development and then began offering Graviola in the United States.

They also developed a new supplement called N-Tense, which contains 50 percent Graviola as well as smaller amounts of seven other cancer-killing botanical extracts

When researchers at the Health Sciences Institute were alerted to the news of Graviola, they began tracking the research done on the cancer killing tree. Evidence of the astounding effectiveness of Graviola, and its shocking cover-up came in fast and furious.

The U.S National Cancer Institute performed the first scientific research in 1976. The results showed that Graviola’s “leaves and stems were found effective in attacking and destroying malignant cells.” Inexplicably, the results were published in an internal report and never released to the public.

Since 1976, Graviola has proven to be an immensely potent cancer killer in 20 independent laboratory tests, yet no double-blind clinical trials—the typical benchmark mainstream doctors and journals use to judge a treatment’s value, were ever initiated.

A study published in the Journal of Natural Products, following a recent study conducted at Catholic University of South Korea stated that one chemical in Graviola was found to selectively kill colon cancer cells at “10,000 times the potency of (the commonly used chemotherapy drug) Adriamycin…”

The most significant part of the Catholic University of South Korea report is that Graviola was shown to selectively target the cancer cells, leaving healthy cells untouched. Unlike chemotherapy, which indiscriminately targets all actively reproducing cells (such as stomach and hair cells), causing the often devastating side effects of nausea and hair loss in cancer patients.

A study at Purdue University recently found that leaves from the Graviola tree killed cancer cells among six human cell lines and were especially effective against prostate, pancreatic and lung cancers…

Graviola fights more than cancer…

While the research on Graviola has focused on its cancer fighting effect, the plant has been used for centuries by medicine men in South America to treat an astonishing number of ailments, including:

hypertension, ringworm, influenza, scurvy, rashes, malaria, neuralgia, dysentery, arthritis, palpitations, rheumatism, nervousness, high blood pressure, insomnia, diarrhea, fever, nausea, boils, dyspepsia, muscle spasm, ulcer,

Despite the mounting collection of laboratory tests and anecdotal reports about this cancer-fighting dynamo, Graviola may always remain an underground therapy!

Graviola has yet to be clinically tested on animals or humans. And because Graviola is a natural product, it can’t be patented. Without the promise of exclusive sales and high profitability, it will likely never again draw the attention of a major drug company or research lab. So we may never see a double-blind clinical study on the tree that’s reported to help defeat cancer.

But there’s no doubt about it, the early laboratory tests and anecdotal reports about Graviola are very exciting. And if you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, you and your doctor should look at all the available treatment options. Graviola may just provide the help you’ve been looking for that could make all the difference in beating cancer.

More Info on the graviola plant/fruit (called guanabana in Mexico)

Site Graviola
Health Sciences Institute The original source for many other articles
Annie Appleseed Major source of scientific information (especially Purdue Univ.)
Graviola.org Major source for general information – many references
Minnesota Wellness Some important comments by a respected site
Rain Tree Major Vendor – Graviola product #1
Rain Tree Major Vendor – Graviola product #2
Cielo Herbals One of many other Graviola vendors
Amazon Teas Another vendor of Amazon products
Tropilab Source for Graviola SEEDS (if you will have a really big greenhouse some day – freeze now)

Third-Party Published Research on Graviola

All available third-party documentation and research on graviola be found at PubMed (a US Gov site).

A partial listing of the third-party published research on graviola is shown below:

Anticancerous & Antitumor Actions:
Kojima, N. “Systematic synthesis of antitumor Annonaceous acetogenins” Yakugaku Zasshi. 2004; 124(10): 673-81.
Tormo, J. R., et al. “In vitro antitumor structure-activity relationships of threo/trans/threo mono-tetrahydro-furanic acetogenins: Correlations with their inhibition of mitochondrial complex I.” Oncol. Res. 2003; 14(3): 147-54.
Yuan, S. S., et al. “Annonacin, a mono-tetrahydrofuran acetogenin, arrests cancer cells at the G1 phase and causes cytotoxicity in a Bax- and caspase-3-related pathway.” Life Sci. 2003 May: 72(25): 2853-61.
Liaw, C. C., et al. “New cytotoxic monotetrahydrofuran Annonaceous acetogenins from Annona muricata.J. Nat. Prod. 2002; 65(4): 470-75
Gonzalez-Coloma, A., et al. “Selective action of acetogenin mitochondrial complex I inhibitors.” Z. Naturforsch. 2002; 57(11-12): 1028-34.
Chang, F. R., et al. “Novel cytotoxic Annonaceous acetogenins from Annona muricata.J. Nat. Prod. 2001; 64(7): 925-31.
Jaramillo, M. C., et al. “Cytotoxicity and antileishmanial activity of Annona muricata pericarp.” Fitoterapia. 2000; 71 (2): 183-6.
Betancur-Galvis, L., et al. “Antitumor and antiviral activity of Colombian medicinal plant extracts.” Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz. 1999; 94(4): 531-35.
Kim, G. S., et al. “Muricoreacin and murihexocin C, mono-tetrahydrofuran acetogenins, from the leaves of Annona muricata.Phytochemistry. 1998; 49(2): 565-71.
Kim, G. S., et al. “Two new mono-tetrahydrofuran ring acetogenins, annomuricin E and muricapentocin, from the leaves of Annona muricata.J. Nat. Prod. 1998; 61(4): 432-36.
Nicolas, H., et al. “Structure-activity relationships of diverse Annonaceous acetogenins against multidrug resistant human mammary adenocarcinoma (MCF-7/Adr) cells.” J. Med. Chem. 1997; 40(13): 2102-6.
Zeng, L., et al. “Five new monotetrahydrofuran ring acetogenins from the leaves of Annona muricata.J. Nat. Prod. 1996; 59(11): 1035-42.
Wu, F. E., et al. “Two new cytotoxic monotetrahydrofuran Annonaceous acetogenins, annomuricins A and B, from the leaves of Annona muricata.J. Nat. Prod. 1995; 58(6): 830-36.
Oberlies, N. H., et al. “Tumor cell growth inhibition by several Annonaceous acetogenins in an in vitro disk diffusion assay.” Cancer Lett. 1995; 96(1): 55-62.
Wu, F. E., et al. “Additional bioactive acetogenins, annomutacin and (2,4-trans and cis)-10R-annonacin-A-ones, from the leaves of Annona muricata.J. Nat. Prod. 1995; 58(9): 1430-37.
Wu, F. E., et al. “New bioactive monotetrahydrofuran Annonaceous acetogenins, annomuricin C and muricatocin C, from the leaves of Annona muricata.J. Nat. Prod. 1995; 58(6): 909-5.
Wu, F. E., et al. “Muricatocins A and B, two new bioactive monotetrahydrofuran Annonaceous acetogenins from the leaves of Annona muricata.J. Nat. Prod. 1995; 58(6): 902-8.
Sundarrao, K., et al. “Preliminary screening of antibacterial and antitumor activities of Papua New Guinean native medicinal plants.” Int. J. Pharmacog. 1993; 31(1): 3-6.
Antimicrobial Actions:
Takahashi, J.A., et al. “Antibacterial activity of eight Brazilian Annonaceae plants.” Nat. Prod. Res. 2006; 20(1): 21-6.
Betancur-Galvis, L., et al. “Antitumor and antiviral activity of Colombian medicinal plant extracts.” Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz 1999; 94(4): 531-35.
Antoun, M. D., et al. “Evaluation of the flora of Puerto Rico for in vitro cytotoxic and anti-HIV activities.” Pharmaceutical Biol. 1999; 37(4): 277-280.
Padma, P., et al. “Effect of the extract of Annona muricata and Petunia nyctaginiflora on Herpes simplex virus.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1998; 61(1): 81–3.
Sundarrao, K., et al. “Preliminary screening of antibacterial and antitumor activities of Papua New Guinean native medicinal plants.” Int. J. Pharmacog. 1993; 31(1): 3–6.
Misas, C. A. J., et al. “Contribution to the biological evaluation of Cuban plants. IV.” Rev. Cubana Med. Trop. 1979; 31(1): 29–35.
Antidepressant & Antistress Actions:
Padma, P., et al. “Effect of Annona muricata and Polyalthia cerasoides on brain neurotransmitters and enzyme monoamine oxidase following cold immobilization stress.” J. Natural Remedies 2001; 1(2): 144–46.
Hasrat, J. A., et al. “Screening of medicinal plants from Suriname for 5-HT 1A ligands: Bioactive isoquinoline alkaloids from the fruit of Annona muricata.” Phytomedicine. 1997; 4(20: 133-140.
Padma, P., et al. “Effect of alcohol extract of Annona muricata on cold immobilization stress induced tissue lipid peroxidation.” Phytother. Res. 1997; 11(4): 326-327.
Hasrat, J. A., et al. “Isoquinoline derivatives isolated from the fruit of Annona muricata as 5-HTergic 5-HT1A receptor agonists in rats: unexploited antidepressive (lead) products.” J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 1997; 49(11): 1145–49.
Antiparasitic, Antimalarial, & Insecticidal Actions:
Luna, J. S., et al. “Acetogenins in Annona muricata L. (Annonaceae) leaves are potent molluscicides.” Nat. Prod. Res. 2006; 20(3): 253-7.
Jaramillo, M. C., et al. “Cytotoxicity and antileishmanial activity of Annona muricata pericarp.” Fitoterapia. 2000; 71(2): 183–6.
Alali, F. Q., et al. “Annonaceous acetogenins as natural pesticides; potent toxicity against insecticide-susceptible and resistant German cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae).” J. Econ. Entomol. 1998; 91(3): 641-9.
Antoun, M. D., et al. “Screening of the flora of Puerto Rico for potential antimalarial bioactives.” Int. J. Pharmacog. 1993; 31(4): 255–58.
Heinrich, M., et al. “Parasitological and microbiological evaluation of Mixe Indian medicinal plants (Mexico).” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1992; 36(1): 81–5.
Bories, C., et al. “Antiparasitic activity of Annona muricata and Annona cherimolia seeds.” Planta Med. 1991; 57(5): 434–36.
Gbeassor, M., et al. “In vitro antimalarial activity of six medicinal plants.” Phytother. Res. 1990; 4(3): 115–17.
Tattersfield, F., et al. “The insecticidal properties of certain species of Annona and an Indian strain of Mundulea sericea (Supli).” Ann. Appl. Biol. 1940; 27: 262–73.
Anticonvulsant, Antispasmodic, & Smooth Muscle Relaxant Actions:
N’gouemo, P., et al. “Effects of ethanol extract of Annona muricata on pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsive seizures in mice.” Phytother. Res. 1997; 11(3): 243–45.
Feng, P. C., et al. “Pharmacological screening of some West Indian medicinal plants.” J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 1962; 14: 556–61.
Hypotensive & Cardiodepressant Actions
Carbajal, D., et al. “Pharmacological screening of plant decoctions commonly used in Cuban folk medicine.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1991; 33(1/2): 21–4.
Feng, P. C., et al. “Pharmacological screening of some West Indian medicinal plants.” J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 1962; 14: 556–61.
Meyer, T. M. “The alkaloids of Annona muricata.” Ing. Ned. Indie. 1941; 8(6): 64.

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